Shore-based stations

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Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 8.00.37 AMAlutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery Burke-O-Lator

Location: Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery (APSH), Seward

Timeline: August 2014 to present

The Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery is located next to the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward.

The Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery is located next to the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward.

Description:  This monitoring system in Seward is part of the IOOS Pacific Region Ocean Acidification Network (IPACOA) that links seven similar sites across along the Pacific coast of North America. The Burke-O-Lator systems were invented by Burke Hales from Oregon State University. The Alutiiq Pride Burke-O-Lator is maintained by Wiley Evans from the Hakai Institute and Jacqueline Ramsay from Alutiiq Pride.

Instrumentation: The Burke-O-Lator pCO2/TCO2 analyzer measures carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) both continuously from a flow-through seawater stream and from seawater collected in discrete samples. This equipment was installed at APSH in August 2014.

The Burke-o-lator measures several different ocean acidification parameters of sea water using a flow-through system at the hatchery.

The Burke-O-Lator measures several different ocean acidification parameters of sea water using a flow-through system at the hatchery.

The Burke-O-Lator is a series of sensors driven by a computer using custom LabVIEW software to control, capture and log the measurements made by the system. Measurements of seawater temperature and salinity are also made in conjunction with measured pCO2 and TCO2. Using these four parameters, the saturation state or aragonite (the most soluble form of calcium carbonate) and pH are determined in real-time. Both the pCO2 and TCO2 measurements are made using non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) technology (LI-COR LI-840A). pCO2 and TCO2 measurements are run sequentially, with the Burke-O-Lator first sampling carrier gas (room air) equilibrated with flowing seawater in the equilibrator to determine the pCO2 continuously for roughly 57 minutes. During the last 3 minutes of the hour, the Burke-O-Lator transitions to sample carrier gas that has captured the evolvedCO2 from a small acidified seawater volume to determine the TCO2. For discrete sample processing, the measurements are the same except headspace gas and sample volume are drawn from the sample bottle rather than the equilibrator and flow-through seawater stream.

Principal Investigator: Wiley Evans, Hakai Institute

Funding and Support Sources: Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS), Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS), Hakai Institute, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ocean Acidification Program, Oregon State University (OSU) College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS), and the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Ocean Acidification Research Center (OARC).

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Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 8.01.18 AMOceansAlaska Burke-O-Lator 

Location: OceansAlaska facility, Ketchikan

Timeline: Installed July 2016. Operational Aug 2016. Expected to operate year-round.

Description:  This monitoring system is part of the IOOS Pacific Region Ocean Acidification Network (IPACOA) that links seven similar sites across along the Pacific coast of North America. The Burke-O-Lator systems were invented by Burke Hales from Oregon State University. The Alutiiq Pride Burke-O-Lator is maintained by Wiley Evans from the Hakai Institute and Conor Eckholm from OceansAlaska.

Oceans Alaska is a shellfish hatchery located in Ketchikan. It is the only site in teh state that produces oyster seeds and makes them available to other growers.

Oceans Alaska is a shellfish hatchery located in Ketchikan. It is the only site in teh state that produces oyster seeds and makes them available to other growers.

Instrumentation: The Burke-O-Lator pCO2/TCO2 analyzer measures carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) both continuously from a flow-through seawater stream and from seawater collected in discrete samples.

The Burke-O-Lator is a series of sensors driven by a computer using custom LabVIEW software to control, capture and log the measurements made by the system. Measurements of seawater temperature and salinity are also made in conjunction with measured pCO2 and TCO2. Using these four parameters, the saturation state or aragonite (the most soluble form of calcium carbonate) and pH are determined in real-time. Both the pCO2 and TCO2 measurements are made using non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) technology (LI-COR LI-840A). pCO2 and TCO2 measurements are run sequentially, with the Burke-O-Lator first sampling carrier gas (room air) equilibrated with flowing seawater in the equilibrator to determine the pCO2 continuously for roughly 57 minutes. During the last 3 minutes of the hour, the Burke-O-Lator transitions to sample carrier gas that has captured the evolvedCO2 from a small acidified seawater volume to determine the TCO2. For discrete sample processing, the measurements are the same except headspace gas and sample volume are drawn from the sample bottle rather than the equilibrator and flow-through seawater stream.

Principal Investigator: Wiley Evans, Hakai Institute

Funding Source: Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS) and the Northwest Associations of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS). Equipment purchased by the UAF Ocean Acidification Research Center.

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Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 8.03.20 AMAlaskan Community OA Sample Processing

Location: Participating villages in OA sample collection are Chenega Bay, Eyak, Nanwalek, Port Graham, Seldovia, Seward, Tatitlek and Valdez. The samples are processed in Seward at the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery (APSH).

Timeline: 2015 – present

Local community members gather water samples in Seldovia to be sent to the Alutiiq Shellfish Hatchery in Seward.

Local community members gather water samples in Seldovia to be sent to the Alutiiq Shellfish Hatchery in Seward.

Description: The Burke-o-lator system at APSH helps process water samples from around the region and is the basis for a developing treatment system to test Alaskan organism response to OA. The goal of this program is to map a two year period to determine what the local near shore water patterns are with regards to carbonate chemistry. Participating partners in the OA sample collection are Prince William Sound Science Center (PWSSC) in Cordova, Kasitsna Bay Lab in Seldovia, Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (KBNERR) in Homer, and Kachemak Shellfish Mariculture Association (KSMA) in Homer.

Instrumentation:  Sea water sample kits were supplied to villages and partners for conducting water sampling. Samples are taken once a week at the same place and same time (if possible), with the goal of continuous sampling for two years. Water samples are “grabbed” in a bucket or directly from the ocean into clean sampling bottles then fixed and capped. These samples are considered stable and can be safely stored at RT prior to processing.

Principal Investigator: Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery (APSH)

Funding Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA)

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Kachemak Bay Research Reserve Stations

Jim Schloemer from KBRR holds sampling apparatus in the Homer harbor.

Jim Schloemer from KBRR holds sampling apparatus in the Homer harbor.

Location: Seldovia and Homer Harbors (year round), Bear Cove (March-Nov)

Timeline: pH probe data since 2001; water samples for carbonate chemistry 2016. Note:Carbonate chemistry needs to be established for the region before aragonite saturation algorithms can be established. 

Instrumentation: YSI pH sensor; water samples for carbonate chemistry at all nutrient monitoring sites.

Description: Ocean acidification was identified by local and regional stakeholders as an important issue in south central Alaska for subsistence & recreational food sources.  Local stakeholders were also concerned that we do not have baseline information to help inform how ocean acidification will transform the local near shore ecology of the region (KBNERR Bivalve Proceedings 2014). The complexity of ocean chemistry in estuaries has led to this important habitat being omitted, thus far, from strategies developed for monitoring ocean acidification in Alaska.  The KBNERR has a long-term monitoring program that can support and help direct additional monitoring and research into the complex nature of ocean acidification in estuary habitats in south-central Alaska.  Through our existing programs and partnerships, we plan to grow this area of expertise for our region on a local, regional, national, and international scale.

Principal Investigator: Angie Doroff, Kachemak Bay Research Reserve (KBNERR)

Funding Source: NOAA, KBNERR for logistic support as part of SWMP 2016.

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